FTTH PON in mobile broadband networks applications

Two main NG-PON2 Applications

Contributors: José Salgado, Rong Zhao, Nuno Monteiro, and Pauline Rigby

  With developments in mobile broadband networks driven primarily by 4G and 5G, next-generation radio cells will be expected to support data rates of up to 10 Gbps. Mobile operators will have to significantly increase the capacity of their radio networks… FOT blog is sharing two main NG-PON2 applications in mobile broadband network: Small Cell Backhaul and C-RAN Architectures.

Small Cell Backhaul

  Mobile operators are deploying small cells at an increasing rate. These low-powered radio access nodes allow mobile operators to increase their capacity in high usage areas and increase their coverage, while also addressing social concerns about high levels of radiation and form factor.
  For small cell sites to be successfully deployed, mobile operators need a cost-effective method to connect the site to their core network. Taking advantage of existing FTTH infrastructure makes a lot of sense. Indeed a new business model is emerging, where operators offer “Small Cells as a Service (SCaaS)” for mobile virtual network operators lacking fixed infrastructure.
  Small cells have demanding quality of service (QoS) and performance requirements. They require high capacity backhaul, low latency and high availability. They also require synchronisation and frequency alignment with macro and other small cells to enable seamless mobility.
  With this in mind, we believe that NG-PON2 technology is well positioned to address the requirements of small cell backhaul.

Current CPRI backhaul topology

Current CPRI backhaul topology

C-RAN Architectures

 

With developments in mobile broadband networks driven primarily by 4G and 5G, next-generation radio cells will be expected to support data rates of up to 10 Gbps.

  Mobile operators will have to significantly increase the capacity of their radio networks, while at the same time they must reduce their capital and operating costs because end user revenues will not keep pace.
  This will unavoidably lead to the deployment of an increasing number of base stations with high spectral efficiency and high power demands. Power and space are a scarce resource at cell sites, and efficiencies can be achieved by moving some parts of the radio network function, which are currently co-located with the antenna at the cell site, to locations deeper in the network. This move to a “Cloud Radio Access Network”, or C-RAN, introduces a new transmission requirement into the overall mobile network infrastructure – mobile fronthaul.
  The C-RAN architecture provides a cost-effective way for service providers to support emerging broadband wireless topologies. Simple remote radio base stations could be located in environmentally challenging locations and centrally controlled from the head office. This would reduce capital and operating costs. The installation costs would be lower, and fewer cell site visits would be required because upgrades and troubleshooting can be performed at the central location. In addition, by removing equipment from the cell site, security is improved (there is no cabinet to break into), and the need for heating and cooling of the enclosure at the cell site is eliminated.
  Currently, the baseband unit (BBU) is typically located in a cabinet at the cell site (or on the pole) and connected to the radio head at the top of the tower using the Common Public Radio Interface (CPRI) protocol (figure above). If the BBU is moved to a central location, high-bandwidth links will be required to connect the remote radio heads to that common central location.

Dedicated wavelength for CPRI

Dedicated wavelength for CPRI

  The simplest option for mobile fronthaul to remote radio heads would be a dedicated optical fibre connection. Equipment based on protocols such as SDH and IP would be expensive to deploy and operate, however; hence, lower-cost alternatives have been suggested.
  A more cost-effective option is to connect the BBU to the remote radio head over an NG-PON2 network, by assigning one of the available wavelengths defined for NG-PON2 to the cell site. The CPRI protocol has been defined with six speeds, including one that closely matches the 10Gbps data rate of NG-PON2 optics.

Latest Blog

About Us

Why FTTH can save telecom cost

FTTH: saving money

【Our Goal】

Benefits our customers via Fiber Network (FTTH).

【FOT Telecom】

Your reliable fiber network equipment and service provider: Read More

Contact us

Email: sales@fiberoptictel.com fiberoptictelecom@gmail.com SKYPE: fanny-lee2007 SKYPE: fiberoptictelecom Tel: +86-20-22098370
Add.: Jitang Industrial Zone, No.8 Nanyun Five road, Huangpu, Guangzhou. 510663
ContactUs.com